At Advanced Neurosurgery Associates (ANA), we are acutely aware that epilepsy represents a complicated combination of physical as well as psychological and emotional consequences. In fact, that’s why we emphasize our team approach to complete family care for our many pediatric epilepsy patients. In order to address all facets of this...

November is National Epilepsy Awareness Month. The goal of these 30 days this month is to spotlight epilepsy and raise awareness. ANA is a strong advocate of this effort, and of the epilepsy community. We support the goal of educating the public about epilepsy and seizures, and to fight social...

[caption id="attachment_3520" align="alignright" width="269"] Stephanie Conklin (right) with Dr. Fried[/caption] How does epilepsy impact the social and emotional lives of children, and of their families and caregivers? The social, emotional and physical ramifications can certainly take their toll. Many wonder if they’ll ever lead a “normal” life again. Well, a “normal” life...

During the month of September, the Hydrocephalus Association (HA) invites everyone to celebrate and honor the many faces of hydrocephalus, and to unite with the organization to create a voice of awareness. Hydrocephalus Awareness Month is a time that individuals and organizations can work together to support the organization’s mission...

Dr. Arno Fried recently presented an overview on childhood brain tumors at a Saint Peter’s University Hospital neuro-oncology symposium on January 30, 2018 in Princeton, New Jersey. The symposium was attended by 40 prominent pediatricians, internists, oncologists and neurologists practicing in central New Jersey. His discussion focused on the evolution...

Dr. Vivek Ramakrishnan attended a meet-and-greet dinner at Steakhouse 85 in New Brunswick on January 27, 2018. Among those in attendance were chiropractic, pain management and neurologic specialists. Dr. Ramakrishnan specializes in complex spine surgery and joined Advanced Neurosurgery Associates in August. He has already been very active in the...

Here’s food for thought: The average adult human brain has about 100 billion cells. Scientists used to think that past childhood, the brain stopped developing. Once all of its connections formed, they were set for life, and then, all these cells would simply begin their inexorable decline....

Why do we eat what we do? Imagine you’re craving something comforting yet undoubtedly naughty. Why do you go for the chocolate, not the broccoli? Why the ice cream instead of the salad? It turns out that this particular preference for sugar is an old one, biologically ingrained for our survival. ...

It was once believed that the brain had a finite capacity for change or healing and that a damaged brain was beyond reasonable hope. The theory was that the brain could compensate by making new connections among its surviving neurons, but its capacity for repairing itself was limited. Yet as far...

Want to be a superager? If that’s a question, it’s clearly a rhetorical one. A superager has a super, youthful brain. Who wouldn’t want a youthful brain?!...

Epilepsy used to be stigmatized to a shocking degree. Not so, anymore. The moral and medical support regarding epilepsy is strong. Today, doctors, nurses and other medical professionals who deal with epilepsy are specially trained and up-to-date in their field. But there’s another frontier to conquer, and it’s one that people...

As part of the public discussion —which includes scientific research findings— I have watched the issue of concussions publicized and debated. An outcry has led to better awareness and some protective measures, but the culture still needs to catch up....